Paper detailsINCLUDES FOLLOWING THINGS IN MY OUTLINE: Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism: 1. Introduction: Definition of Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism: Theravada “the doctrine of elders” is the school of Buddhism that draws its scriptural inspiration from pali canon, which scholar generally agree contains the earliest surviving record of Buddha’s teachings. Mahayana Buddhism is the school of Buddhism that puts emphasis on the path of Bodhisattva which means one who work in order to bring enlightenment for all sentinel beings. Buddhism doctrine and History of Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism: Buddhism doctrine is based upon four nobleTheravada is traditionally practiced in South east Asia in countries like SriLanka, Thailand, Burma, Laos and Cambodia whereas Mahayana Buddhism is practiced in Northern Asian in countries like China, Taiwan, Tibet, Nepal, Japan, Korea, Mongolia etc. Theravada is the most conservative school of Buddhism which claims to have conserved the teachings of Buddha in its original form. Its origin was during the Second Counsel of Buddhism held about the Century after Buddha’s death. Thera (Elders) condemned the novel interpretations of Buddhist doctrine and emphasized an orthodox and conservative view of Buddhism. Theravada Buddhism devote the whole energy of man directly to the attainment of release (nirvana) from the world of eternal becoming Samsara. 2. Thesis Statement: The focus of my paper is to examine current state of these religion in modern context based on their historical and theological development and examining its role in morphing the structural fabric of society. 3. Purpose of Research paper: How Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism are currently practiced in different parts of the world. The major differences between two doctrines and how does it affect the life of the people in the society. Body: 1. Topic 1: Historical and Theological development of Theravada Buddhism and how it is practiced and structure of society in which this form of Buddhism is practiced. 2. Topic 2: Historical and Theological development of Mahayana Buddhism and how it is practiced and structure of society in which this form of Buddhism is practiced. 3. Difference between Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism and its impact in the society. Conclusion: 1. Impact of two kinds of practice in the society. 2. Current state of these practices in different parts of the world. Works Cited: 1. Prebish, Charles, and Damien Keown. Introducing Buddhism. 2nd ed. New York: Routledge, 2010. Print 2. Strong, John. The Experience of Buddhism: Sources and Interpretations. 3rd ed. Belmont, CA: Thomson/Wadsworth, 2007. Print. 3. Coomaraswamy, Ananda. “The Gods of Mahāyāna Buddhism.” The Burlington Magazine for Connoisseurs, vol. 27, no. 148, 1915, pp. 139–141. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/859881. 4. Cohen, Richard S. “Discontented Categories: Hīnayāna and Mahāyāna in Indian Buddhist History.” Journal of the American Academy of Religion, vol. 63, no. 1, 1995, pp. 1–25. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/1465151. 5. Rupp, George. “The Relationship between Nirvāna and Samsāra: An Essay on the Evolution of Buddhist Ethics.” Philosophy East and West, vol. 21, no. 1, 1971, pp. 55–67. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/1397764.
Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism